Postcards from Edinburgh

In which Sara does a lot of urban hiking, reports on her writing, learns that Presbyterians have cathedrals, too, and makes new friends.

From the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art

From the Scottish Gallery of Modern Art

I’ve been in Edinburgh for a week and having a wonderful time. (Would anyone have expected any different?) The week–Week One of Two, but this may be the only blog post–has been a great balance of writing, walking, and just the right amount of sight-seeing. I’m staying at Emmaus House, a Benedictine-inspired guest house conveniently situated close to just about everything, without being too much in the thick of the heavy tourist trade that characterizes much of this city. Most days I walk to the gym after breakfast: about 25 minutes along the Royal Mile, the most touristed part of town, but fun to walk along before all the tourists get there. I’ve explored a few of the abundant (and free) museums and art galleries, and done most of the obligatory churchgoing one

From the Lady Chapel at Old St. Paul's

From the Lady Chapel at Old St. Paul’s

would expect: Evensong at St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral, Sunday Eucharist at Old St. Paul’s, and a self-guided tour of St. Giles which is, as everyone assured me it would be, an amazing place, massive and rich in history as the mother church of Presbyterianism in Scotland should be. A few more places remain on my list to see (and feel free to comment with the houses of worship on your must-see list, if you haven’t already).

St. Mary's Episcopal Cathedral

St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral

I have been making progress in my writing life which, being as it’s me, has been very slow and fraught with procrastination, distraction, agonizing, self-doubt, and criticism. However, thanks to help from mentors and friends along the way (who are secretly travelling with me even if they don’t even know it), I’ve been able to put a lot of that on the back burner and actually get some work done. Today, for the very first time since beginning this project three years ago, I suddenly realized that it was turning into a book. That I was thinking of it not just as “my writing” or “my &$%# memoir,” but “my book.” Of course, that only works if I pronounce it the way the Scots do: my boook.

IMG_1856If I was asked to identify just one highlight of Edinburgh thus far, it would have to be the discovery of Emmaus House. The small community here offers a degree of hospitality that I find incredibly nourishing, inspiring, and non-intrusive. In a short amount of time I have become attached to everyone in the house, and hope to come back over and over again in the years to come, joining the community in prayer between visits. 

The hike up to Arthur's Seat (not named for King Arthur at all...look it up!)

The hike up to Arthur’s Seat (not named for King Arthur at all…look it up!)

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2 thoughts on “Postcards from Edinburgh

  1. Lovely Sara! Been enjoying traveling with you. And, at the same time, I’m loving time in Portland on bike. Yeah summer! meg

  2. Ken Leech keeps telling me we should meet and I’m sorry we haven’t! You sound like fun. Do you know Elizabeth and John Orens? They were in Edinburgh this week too.

    Have you been to St Michael & All Saints yet? It is just round the corner and my ‘home’ church.

    AT the Scottish National ARt Gallery have you been downstairs to the Scottish art section? Look for John Duncan’s St Bride – my favourite painting. And the tapestries of Pheobe Traquair are stunning.

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