The Journey of Lent

I have been ranting a bit about the word “journey.” Like so many words, if we use it too much, it loses meaning. Lately I’ve been hearing too much about the cancer journey. A friend now receives regular posts from a blog called “Your Young Adult Cancer Journey.”  We talk about our faith journey, our life journey, our vocational journey, our journey to adulthood. When someone is near death, we pray for their journey to the next chapter. I recently preached a sermon on the Transfiguration gospel that begged for the word, and I refused to use it–instead, I talked about the gospel being about movement, about Jesus’ trek to Jerusalem, about the mountain top as a way-station, and about our call to trudge on level ground.

(My sermon looked like this. This is a change for me in my homiletical journey…what do your sermons look like when you’re ready to move from preparation to delivery?)

All journey-bashing aside, those of us who follow Jesus are, in fact, embarking on what we often refer to as our Lenten journey which is, at least for me, very much like all of life. Lent is a time to look at what I let between me and God, a time to clean up and a time to pare down. It is a specific journey through the calendar toward Holy Week and Easter, and also a journey toward only God knows where. I came across a poem recently by Ellen Bass which might be my very favorite poem this week, “Asking Directions in Paris.” You can watch and listen to the poet read it here, and I hope you do. If you don’t, here are the lines that stopped me in my tracks:

And as you…set off full of groundless hope,
you think this must be how it is
with destiny: God explaining
and explaining what you must do,
and all you can make out is a few
unconnected phrases, a word or two, a wave
in what you pray is the right direction.

*

If you find yourself on a Lenten journey or any other kind of journey, I pray that you will, indeed, find yourselves full of hope, groundless or otherwise, that God will lead you in the right direction.

 

Psalm 143, appointed for Ash Wednesday

 

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When in Jerusalem…

Coptic Madonna and Child


Razzouk family stamps

Several of our pilgrims came to the Holy Land already planning to get a tattoo as a lifelong souvenir, and several more decided to get one once they’d hung around Razzouk’s, a tiny cozy shop just a block away from the Gloria Hotel where we stay in the Old City.  The shop has been in business since the 1300s. The Razzouk family are Coptic Christians, and many of the tattoo stamps used in place of a printed stencil are centuries old, inspired by traditional coptic images.  Kierstin Brown’s Madonna & Child is a good example.  Long before the Crusades, the Copts claimed to be the “the original pilgrims” to the Holy Land, and etched a tiny cross on their inner wrist to indicate their identity as faithful Christians during a time of strife and mistrust. Several of us got these tiny wrist crosses (which Wassim Razzouk took less than two minutes to create—how painful can it be?). The traditional Jerusalem Cross is seen everywhere throughout the city. While it has in the past been referred to as the “Crusaders Cross,” it is also recognized in Jerusalem as the Jerusalem Cross, the Jesus Cross, the Pilgrim’s Cross, and the Franciscan Cross. The identification with the Crusaders is troublesome to some, and yet it is perhaps an opportunity to reclaim the image from a particular era for all the centuries since, including ours.

Jerusalem Cross

Christians are a very small minority in the Holy Land, and make up less than two percent of the population in Jerusalem. Especially for those of us who inhabit the Pacific Northwest, where so many of us find ourselves reticent to share about our faith, wearing the symbol of our faith on our arm in such a committed way is a way for us to show solidarity with Christians who struggle in this Holy Land with all of its challenges, as well as to proclaim our faith to those around us in our own settings.

Day Seven (or Eight?): Living Stones

We’ve quickly moved into a space where time runs together. This happens on vacation, pilgrimage, silent retreat, backpacking trip. It’s hard to keep track of details, and yet the richness of experience continues to flow. This is as it should be.

On Sunday (which was more or less the eighth day), we worshiped at St. George’s Cathedral, and visited afterwards with its Dean. Kevin Meadows offers this reflection on the day:

This morning we attended Mass at St. George’s Cathedral, the Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Jerusalem. The Very Rev’d Hosam E. Naoum, Dean of the Cathedral, officiated the Mass and provided the sermon. We had a chance to have tea and coffee with him and several parishioners afterwards. He shared with us a brief history of the Cathedral, an overview of the Diocese of Jerusalem, as well as the diocese’s ministries here in Jerusalem.

The Very Rev. Hosam Naoum and Mother Sara

The Diocese covers an amazing, and amazingly complex, geography – including not just Jerusalem, but also parishes in Jordan, Palestine, Israel, Syria and Lebanon. He spoke of the ministries they provide: health care services, educational programs and other humanitarian work. He also spoke of the role of the Diocese, and Christians in general, in ongoing peace and reconciliation efforts between the various religious groups and nation states wrestling for control of this land. While commenting on what drives him in this work, he noted that we are a people of hope. “And remember,” he said, “right near here is the empty tomb.” The empty tomb is the source of hope at the center of our faith and at the center of the day-to-day lives of people living, working, and praying in Jerusalem. It is this hope, the Dean was quick to remind us, that inspires him and many other Christians in the region, in spite of devastating conflict and struggle. Christ has risen!

And this relates to a final ministry Reverend Naoum mentioned – the role of the diocese in supporting the pilgrimage of Christians like us. In talking about pilgrimage, the Dean distinguished between encountering what he called “ancient stones” and “living stones.” The ancient stones are the ones we visit, snap pictures of, and read about in pamphlets or books. The living stones, however, are the lives of those impacted by an encounter with the story told by the ancient stones – the story of hope. And what distinguishes our pilgrimage from a mere Holy Land tour, is that we are here to encounter not just the ancient stones, but especially the living ones. We have been blessed to encounter many such living stones while here, as we did while visiting the children at St Vincent Creche/Orphanage; listening to Rev. Dr. Mitri Raheb speak of the role of Dar al-Kalima University in changing the lives of the Palestinians students who attend; or listening to the stories of our fellow pilgrims, especially as they describe their encounter with this place.
Ghassan, our tour guide, has said several times that a given site may or may not be the actual place where this or that biblical event happened. The importance of these places lies not so much in geographical accuracy or specificity, but how these places have given birth to a story of hope that transcends time and place, changing the lives of those who believe. It is the story of this place that has meaning, not just the physical location. Being so near these sites merely provides us a more enlivened encounter with that story, the story of the greatest hope of all.
For those of us who are blessed to be on this pilgrimage, I pray that our experience here may make us living stones, perhaps just a little more so than the start of our pilgrimage. For our loved ones, family and friends reading this blog from a distance, I pray that your lives too are changed by your own encounter with the story of hope, even if it you are reading this from a bit further away from these ancient stones.
Kevin’s fellow pilgrim Heidi McElrath offers remarkably similar–but well worth sharing–reflections on living stones: 
The dean (the first indigenous dean, he told us) says pilgrims to the Holy Land who do not meet the local church have come to see the dead stones – the one rolled away from the tomb, the one that Jesus prayed on in Gethsemane, the ones that form the Holy Sepulcher or the Church of the Assumption – but they forget about the living stones, the faithful who make up the church today. These Palestinian Christians have a hard road to walk. The dean explained that though he is Palestinian, he carries an Israeli passport and cannot visit churches in several countries in his diocese, including Syria and Iran. The bishop himself has just visited the episcopal church in Damascus for the first time in almost 6 years (it is still thriving). My 40 minute bus ride to church pales in comparison.

Pilgrims, too, are living stones

As I look around at my fellow pilgrims, I think how they are, too, are living stones. These people I have the honor to love and live with, these are the stones of my church. You who are in Seattle and you who are far away and you who make up the faithful wherever you live. You are the living stones. Seeing you, speaking with you, praying with you, riding a bus with you and a scouting out pomegranate juice with you — these are actions that make pilgrimage a lifelong endeavor.

I am so grateful for the opportunity to be here to see these “dead “stones, these ancient foundations of the faith that have been built upon over and over and over, that have been prayed on for millennia. I’m grateful for the chance to celebrate the Eucharist with believers in Jerusalem. I’m grateful (eternally) for the living stones I get to take back to Seattle with me and those who are waiting for our return. I’m grateful to be on a lifelong pilgrimage together every single day.

Day Six: Bethlehem

The separation wall

Friday in Bethlehem was a full, rich, and hard day. We began with a visit to a portion of the Separation Wall between Jerusalem and Bethlehem covered with murals and graffiti, the art of resistance. We then visited the St. Vincent Creche, an orphanage where we visited with its director and dozens of children, and shared mass together there. Before lunch, we went to the Daral-Kalima University College of Arts and Culture to hear a presentation that was both stirring and extremely informative about the situation in Bethlehem for Christians, as well as about the facts on the ground about resources of land, water, electricity, etc., for Palestinians throughout the region. After lunch we visited the Shepherd’s Field, and sang and prayed in the cave near where the shepherds likely heard the announcement from the angels about the birth of our Savior. After the morning, it was good news many of us needed to hear.

Ryan was very popular at the Creche!

Elizabeth Schroeder has written a separate post about the experience at the Creche. Stephen Cherry blogged about his experience of our day here.

What follows are some words from our many reflections on this intense day.

  • Jesus’ perfect love casts out fear. It’s just jolly hard to get hold of perfect love.
  • Berlin. Belfast. Bethlehem. Brownsville.
  • The sea is so vast and my boat is so small.
  • It’s a very different sea from Galilee.
  • The news all feels really bad, but there’s something hopeful about a room full of Americans hearing it, listening and witnessing.
  • There is an element in all that we saw of the tragedy of some people’s desires leading to others’ suffering.
  • Seeing the things we’ve seen here (the separation wall, the discrimination, the economic disparity) makes it easier for us to recognize it at home.
  • We’ve been following Jesus on this pilgrimage, but it also seems like we’ve been following Mary.

The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness cannot overcome it.

Day Five: Loaves, Fishes, and Fishing for People 

Today we said goodbye to the Sea of Galilee, but not before several powerful stops along the shore and a memorable boat ride. Once again, pilgrim Joe McDermott provides his reflection on the day:

Five Loaves & Two Fish

One of my favorite books as a young child was about the Multiplication of the Loaves and Fishes as told from the perspective of a young boy. As we read in Matthew 14:13-21, a crowd numbering 5,000, plus women and children, were gathered near the Sea of Galilee to hear Jesus preach. As evening grew, the disciples wanted to disperse everyone so they could go to the nearby villages to get something to eat as they had nothing to feed them. Jesus instructed them to feed the people. The young boy in my storybook offered what little he had – 5 loaves and 2 fish. Jesus prayed over the food and it was broken and shared. The entire crowd ate their fill and there were 12 large baskets when they collected the leftovers. The small amount the small boy shared, after Jesus’ blessing, miraculously fed the entire crowd. A supernatural miracle for sure as I understood it.

I will always remember how I was struck by an interpretation of this Gospel story when I heard it for the first time – years later as an adult. Perhaps it wasn’t a supernatural miracle that the 5 loaves and 2 fish fed 5,000 plus the women and children. Maybe the real miracle was that the crowd all had bits of food they were hoarding to themselves. The miracle was that one person’s small offering inspired others to share. The miracle was that people shared, both of their abundance and of their necessity, and together there amounted to 12 baskets of abundance. I recognize this understanding as the miracle – that when we all share generously everyone has their fill and there is an abundance.

Today, on the third full day of our being together on pilgrimage in the Holy Land of Israel and Palestine, we began our day at the Church of Heptapegon. On this site from 28-350 AD the Judeo-Christians of Capernaum venerated a large rock upon which Jesus is said to have laid the bread and fish before He fed the 5,000 plus women and children. By about 350 AD the rock was used as an altar at the very center of the church built on this site, built by a Jewish nobleman from Tiberius some venerate as Saint Josipos. In roughly 480 AD a Byzantine church with a rich mosaic floor was erected at the site with the venerated rock placed beneath the altar. During the Persian invasion this Heptapegon Church was destroyed and faded into oblivion. After the Muslim conquest (638 AD), Christian activity ceased around the Sea of Galilee for centuries. It was in 1932 that the ancient church ruins were excavated by Fr. Andreas Evarist Mader SDS and team. The mosaics were found surprisingly largely intact. In the early 1980s the ancient Byzantine basilica was reconstructed.

After visiting the church, our pilgrim group gathered down at the shores of the Sea of Galilee where Mother Sara celebrated a moving outdoor Mass. The setting was inspired, sun-drenched lakeshores Jesus walked. In his sermon, Fr Rob acknowledged the historical places we are visiting – where Jesus walked and lived and demonstrated his divinity. But he ever so warmly called us to not only take in the history we are so surrounded by, but also to be at least as mindful of the Living Christ who is with us on this journey. Jesus among us. Jesus within us. Jesus in one another. And so very much alive today.

Day Four: Nazareth and Galilee with Mary and Jesus

The altar at Duc in Altum Church, with Galilee in the background

We began the day in Nazareth and ended on the Sea of Galilee, the weather changing as often as our location. The end of the day was lovely and full of light, and our pre-dinner sharing felt the same. Heidi McElrath shared her experience and I asked her to write it down to share with all of you.

*

When I was young, I remember being told that Mary was also young. When I’ve been scared, I remember being told that Mary was also scared. When I’ve talked of my desire to be a poet, I remember being told that Mary, too, was a poet. I always found comfort in the thought that God could take someone so weak — someone like me — and use her to enact salvation in the world.

The church of Mary’s Well

Today, we stood in the Basilica of the Annunciation, in the house where tradition holds that Mary was visited by Gabriel, where Jesus’s human body began. We dipped our fingers into the well where Mary collected each day’s water. We walked the land of Jesus’s formation—shaped, drenched, and witnessed by Mary.

The narthex of the Duc in Altum Church

We visited the archaeological site at Magdala—home to another famous Mary—and the beautiful Duc In Altum chapel. The entryway to the building is a huge atrium, held up by eight pillars inscribed with names of our church mothers—Mary Magdalene, Susanna, Salome, Martha and Mary—and one is blank to represent “women of all time who love God and live by faith.”

I have never known so significant or beautiful a space dedicated to the spiritual work of women. To stand on the holy shore of the Sea of Galilee in a room surrounded by the maternal pillars of our church was overwhelming.

Once the majority of our group had left the building, Kierstin, Adrienne, and I took an extra moment to reverence the space and the women it represented. I wished desperately to remember even one setting of the Magnificat that I used to sing so regularly. All that came easily to mind were these lines:

He hath put down the mighty from their seat
and hath exalted the humble and meek.
He hath filled the hungry with good things
and the rich he hath sent empty away.

I have come to see that yes, Mary was a young, scared, poet of a girl, but she was also a bold, revolutionary thinker who worshipped a God who wanted to overthrow hierarchies and class systems. Mary was invested, even before Jesus was born, in feeding the hungry, taking down the mighty, exalting the meek, and she shared this with her son.

This is the Mary who birthed Jesus, who taught him to speak and walk and live. This is the Mary who is our first example of the Christian life.

Heidi, Adrienne, and Kierstin

So with confidence, we three twentysomething women spoke loudly in this room of our mothers: Hail Mary, full of grace. Our Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death.

I pray that we can see ourselves reflected in this bold, revolutionary woman, who formed our Savior, who was scared and young and poetic and helped God turn the world upside down.

Amen.

Day Three: Arrival and Transfiguration

Our tired, happy group arrived in Tel Aviv at 9:30am, Israel time, collected ourselves and our luggage, found our guide, Ghassan, and boarded the bus that will be our home away from our various homes away from home for the next 9 days.

“”We drove past small towns and rich farmland to meet up for lunch with our group members who had arrived from other places the previous day. Those people had the benefit of this lovely sunrise over the Sea of Galilee on Tuesday morning; it rained most of the day but we hope for a similar sunrise Wednesday or Thursday!

Joe McDermott contributed the rest of today’s post:

Today at the beginning of our Pilgrimage here in Israel and Palestine, we went to the top of Mount Tabor, where believers hold that the Transfiguration took place. (See: Matthew, Chapter 17)  We’d had many paths to gather here in the Holy Land (I’ll take my pre-pilgrimage holiday over the diversion to Newark and 9 hour layover many shared any day!), and this was a fitting place to begin.

“”

“”

There are two churches at the top of a striking mount rising up out of the plains, one Franciscan and Greek Orthodox (which seems to be closed). The pictures are of the Franciscan church exterior, the nave, detail of the mosaic above the main altar, Rev Rob Rhodes (Associate Rector at St Paul’s) celebrating Mass in the Elijah side chapel, the detail of Moses above the altar in the other side chapel, and a view from the church to the valley below. 
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 It became clear I wasn’t alone finding myself in awe to be standing for the first time in a place Jesus walked.  Through our shared liturgy, we became a transformed gathering of pilgrims, shedding any tourist-identity we still had tagging along.  Jesus reveals himself to us – sometimes in dazzling white – and sometimes asks us to hold that in our hearts until the time is right.  I hold this experience in my heart and know that I will have the skill and insight to share it in the right way when the time is right.  We as a group see ourselves differently as well, transformed by the experience.  We went up the mount perhaps a group of tourists and came down a community of pilgrims.  This is a fitting beginning.

 Growing up Camp Filed, the former Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) summer camp and retreat where Sleeping Lady Conference Center is now outside Leavenworth, Washington, was very important to me and my family.  Thus beginning at Mount Tabor was particularly poignant for me as the Chapel at Camp Field was the Chapel of the Transfiguration and I had occasion to remember dear friends in my prayers there this afternoon.

Remembering where we come from and entering into a spirit of pilgrimage, its been a good day.